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Syria, Kurds propose an international tribunal to judge Isis crimes

Syria, Kurds Propose An International Tribunal To Judge Isis Crimes

Kurds in Syria propose the establishment of an international tribunal to judge Isis crimes in the north and east of the country. Today, in SDF prisons, there are more than 5,000 militants of the Islamic State and 9,000 members of their families

The Kurdish administration in Syria calls on the international community to set up a special court to try ISIS members for their crimes committed in the north and east of the country. The goal is to ensure that the militants of the Islamic State have a fair trial based on human rights. The Kurds are addressing in particular those countries, whose citizens have been part of Daesh and have been arrested by the Jazeera Storm SDF, to ask for cooperation so that the court is born and given support. Both in the logistical aspects and in the legal ones. To date, Arab-Kurdish forces in Deir Ezzor have more than 5,000 IS fundamentalist and over 9,000 members of their families in custody. Many of them, however, are foreigners. The SDF have repeatedly called for the countries of origin to take back their citizens. So far, however, few have actually done so.

The international tribunal would bring advantages in the fight against Daesh and jihadist terrorism. Moreover, it would remove from the impasse the western countries that don’t want to take back their foreign fighters

The idea of ​​the international tribunal that processes ISIS members, if approved, would bring great advantages in the fight against Islamist-based terrorism. In fact, it would give an important signal to possible supporters: that the jihadists, despite the barbarism perpetrated by the jihadists of the Islamic State, would be tried fairly and justly. Moreover, from a supranational body and not at the level of a single state. Thus, all the alibis of propaganda about alleged summary justice, dictated by revenge against Daesh, would fall. Moreover, it would remove from impasse several Western countries, signatories of the moratorium on the death penalty, which do not want to take back their foreign fighters. But they risk having to do so as a result of the fact that those who would judge them admit the capital sentence in their judicial system, like Syria or Iraq.

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