skip to Main Content

Syria, ISIS as expected, attacks the SAA at Abu Kamal

Syria, ISIS As Expected, Attacks The SAA At Abu Kamal

Isis, as expected, launches a mass attack against the Syrian army (SAA) in Abu Kamal. Objective: to open a route to Iraq, which passes south of Deir Ezzor. There will probably be new militia blitzes soon

As expected, Isis massively attacked the Syrian army (SAA) and allied militia allies at Abu Kamal. The Islamic State militants are trying to open a new route to the east of Deir Ezzor, in an area close to the border with Iraq. Getting there is strategic, as it would allow the militants to cross the border if engaged by the Jazeera Storm SDF. The blitz was in the air for some time and was preceded by an increase in Daesh offensives against the SAA in the cities along the Euphrates. In fact, soldiers in recent days have received reinforcements in all the main cities of the quadrant. Thanks to this, they managed to maintain the defensive lines and to repel the attack. It is not excluded, however, that soon there will be further infiltration attempts by jihadists.

Meanwhile, Jazeera Storm’s SDF continue to hunt Daesh cells. Both on Shaddadi Road (Busayrah, Shahil and Dhiban) and inside towards Raqqa and Hasakah

Meanwhile, the SDF continue the hunt for Isis cells east of Deir Ezzor. Both on Shaddadi Road (Busayrah, Shahil and Dhiban), which runs along the Euphrates, and inland towards Raqqa and Hasakah. The last operation of Jazeera Storm not only led to the capture of more than 30 militiamen of the Islamic State, but also to the discovery of numerous “precious” information. This meant that the maneuvers continued towards other destinations in the Syrian province, where some Daesh groups are believed to have been hidden. These would be responsible for numerous attacks against Arab-Kurdish forces and the population, especially through the use of bombs and IEDs. The terrorists, in fact, are short of strength and resources. As a result, they switched to a “remote” guerrilla strategy, such as the one that characterized Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003.

Back To Top