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Cybercrime, 23 million stolen credit and debit card numbers on sale on DarkWeb

Cybercrime, 23 Million Stolen Credit And Debit Card Numbers On Sale On DarkWeb

Sixgill: There have been over 23 million stolen credit and debit card numbers offered for sale on DarkWeb in the first half of 2019. Cybercrime actors move outside traditional website-based markets, turning to IRC and encrypted Telegram channels

There have been over 23 million stolen credit and debit card numbers offered for sale on DarkWeb in the first half of 2019. It has been discovered by Sixgill cyber security experts, who recently examined underground markets. Nearly two out of every three stolen cards, more than 15 million, were issued in the U.S. On the second place there is the U.K. On the contrary, numbers from Russia amounts to virtually zero – just 316 cards out of 23 million. According to the researchers, cybercrime actors are moving outside traditional website-based markets, turning to Instant Relay Chat (IRC) and encrypted Telegram channels instead. One IRC channel hosts a bot that is able to quickly validate stolen cards. It was used more than 425,000 times in the first half of 2019.

The cyber security experts: Compromised card information are sold for $5. Buyers, to avoid be cheated, use service on IRCs to quickly check the veracity of cards, usually through very small payments

According to the cyber security experts, cybercrime sells compromised credit card information on DarkWeb markets for as little as $5, and comes in two classes. “CVV” information is sold with the three-digit number on the back of the card, which tend to be used in schemes in which criminals order things online. “Dumps,” which contain all of the information on the magnetic strip necessary to swipe, are used to replicate physical cards and make in-store purchases. Cards with CVV numbers were more popular, in part because the ability to fabricate new cards to be used in-person is far more difficult than using an ecommerce site. To avoid be cheated, buyers use services found on Internet Relay Chat sites to quickly check the veracity of cards, usually through very small payments. Buyers are quick to post on message boards when bogus data is sold.

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