Cyber Security, it’s easy to spread propaganda using Smart TV as a vector

Smarttv Cybersecurity Propaganda Hackers Iot Chromecasts Cyberattacks Cybercrime Infosec

@TheHackerGiraffe and @j3ws3r, forced dozens of thousands of devices to play pro-PewDiePie video. They demonstrated that’s possible to spread and broadcast propaganda using the Smart TVs

Two hackers demonstrated how it’s possible to spread propaganda, using Smart TVs. This thanks to the fact that thousands of people have left their Google Chromecasts and smart televisions without a proper cyber security. According to Forbes, the two (@TheHackerGiraffe and @j3ws3r) forced dozens of thousands of devices to play pro-PewDiePie video. The CastHack website announced that the last count reached 65,283 victims. The authors explained they’d carried out the cyber attack partly to promote PewDiePie; but also to encourage users to secure their devices. TheHackerGiraffe was behind a similar attack in which he forced thousands of printers to print pages of PewDiePie support. Moreover, the hackers pointed out that it was possible to collect all information from people’s homes. Including what devices the Chromecast or Google Home was connected to Wi-Fi, what bluetooth devices it was paired with. It was also possible to tamper and control them.

The experiment demostrated that also IoTs could become a vehicle for propaganda or a weapon for bad actors

The experiment of the two hackers with the smart televisions demonstrated that also IoTs could become a vehicle for propaganda or a weapon for bad actors. And they could spread or boradcast dangerous messages easily. The risk is high, especially because the television is the first device used in homes (and are growing at offices). So, the potential target audience is enormous. Governments have to take action, working with producers and Web companies, to increase their cyber security as soon as possible. Especially on the side of the user awareness. It’s not difficult to protect against those threats. For example, disabling the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP). It helps devices to connect to a router. But a worm or malware program can use UPnP to compromise the security of the LAN. So it’s better to manually set it up.